Zack To The Future Podcast

Zack To The Future: Highlights From The Podcast

Episodes 1 &2

Mark-Paul Gosselaar claims he hasn’t watched an episode of Saved by the Bell since it ended in 1994. Whenever he has been asked about his memories of filming the teen show he says he doesn’t remember anything about it really. In an effort to jog his memory, he reached out to Dashiell Driscoll. Driscoll is famous for his “Zack Morris is Trash” YouTube videos and a self-appointed expert on all things Saved by the Bell. Together, Driscoll and Gosselaar are hosting a podcast (August 2020) called Zack to the Future. Each week they watch a new episode and dissect it.

Driscoll reminded Gosselaar and the audience that the first episode that aired was “Dancing At The Max.” There was a pilot episode that aired as Episode 15. “Dancing At The Max” premiered on Sunday night after Family Ties on August 20, 1989. The Second episode aired on Saturday, August 21, 1989.

Gosselaar commented on the cartoonish nature of the show and how they often had famous voice actors as extras or as the teachers. In fact, Gosselaar first commercial was for the 80s Cartoon The Smurfs. He also mentioned how Lopez and Berkeley were trained dancers, but he was not. He had been very self-conscious about dancing on camera. He mentioned looking up to Elizabeth Berkeley at the time because she was older than him. He talked about his first kiss being on screen as well, but during Good Morning Miss Bliss. His kiss with the teen rocker Stevie was his first kiss in real life.

In the Second Podcast they discussed the Episode “The Lisa Card.” Both Driscoll and Gosselaar commented on the fact that there were some moments in the episode that were outdated and would have been deemed inappropriate today.

Driscoll mentions that in Peter Engle’s book I Was Saved By The Bell, that Lark Vorhees was on the verge of being fired. She hadn’t gone over well or had done a bad taping. Tartikoff wanted her gone, but Engle kept her. Then she had an episode that was Lisa Centered and proved herself worthy. She was kept on after that.

Gosselaar remembered the time outs where he would break the fourth wall and talk to the audience or camera. It made him extremely anxious do the TTCs, as he called them. (Talk To The Camera.) He liked doing the fantasy bubbles because they were often pre-taped and not done before an audience. Gosselaar also recalled going to Ed Debevic’s on Fridays after they taped the show. Ed Debevic’s was a 50s themed diner. He would often see Chad Allen there. He also mentioned going to The Sizzler with his mother after he had a full day of auditions, but that was before Saved by The Bell. Gosselaar, apparently gets car sick and The Sizzler on Highland was a reward for tolerating the long day of driving around LA.

Anyway, at the end of the episode, Elizabeth Berkeley joined them on the phone and added in a few of her memories—mostly that she had fun dancing. Interesting bit of trivia is that Maria Henley, who was a stage manager on Saved By The Bell, had a son named Youree Henley. Youree was an assistant to the producers and an extra on the show. He later went on to produce the Oscar nominated movie The Lighthouse.

About carilynn27

Reading and writing and writing about reading are my passion. I've been keeping a journal since I was 14. I also write fiction and poetry. I published my first collection of short stories, "Radiant Darkness" in 2000. I followed that up with my first collection of poetry in 2001 called "Journey without a Map." In 2008, I published "Persephone's Echo" another collection of poetry. Since then I've also published Emotional Espionage, The Way The Story Ended, My Perfect Drug and Out There. I have my BA in English from The Ohio State University at Mansfield and my MA in English Lit from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. I also have my Post BA Certificate in Women's Studies. I am the mother of two beautiful children. :-)
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